Tag Archives: Engagement

Engagement: Part V. Mutatis Mutandis

As I have repeated throughout this series on engagement, I do not presume in presenting this “practical ideal” that anyone else will regard it as either practical or ideal for their own purposes or predilections. If any element of the … Continue reading

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Engagement: Part IV. Building a History

The class project (The Genealogy of the American Present) for our imaginary US History I course of 320 undergraduate students will be a publicly readable (but not publicly editable) wiki that comprises multiple–often overlapping, sometimes contradictory–views of themes, events, individuals, … Continue reading

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Engagement: Part III. Cognition & Competencies

It seems like only yesterday that my preschool chums and I would romp on the playground, clasping hands and chanting nonsense rhymes in unison: Mental disciplinarians, Lamarckian spontan-generians, Transfers! Transfers! All fall down! Only, not wanting to dirty our knees … Continue reading

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Engagement: Part II

Previously, on Engagement: Concerns about coverage and cultural literacy are based on faulty assumptions and nonexistent mandates; they are merely imaginary obstacles to teaching approaches that employ more “doing history” than “listening to history”–and the “listening to history” approach was … Continue reading

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Engagement: Part I. What Does It Look Like and Sound Like?

To those of us committed to reforming the traditional stand-and-deliver lecture format of the big survey courses in history, the concerns of those who currently lecture to crowds of students in such courses may initially feel like passive resistance to … Continue reading

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